Top 20 Seminar Scams and Tricks
by Tom Antion

I decided to write this article after spending over half my speaking career (about 12 years) speaking at public seminars and watching the decline of service provided by seminar speakers and promoters and the increase in scammer speakers getting rich while committing fraud at the expense of mostly unknowing and trusting people.

I’m hoping those speakers/promoters on the edge will clean up their acts and the really bad ones will be exposed. The good ones won’t be bothered a bit because they don’t allow these kinds of activities to occur at their events. I might add that this document is talking about expensive coaching / training programs sold at these seminars, not low cost items like books or a small CD set.

Maybe you need a kick in the rear no matter what the cost

The reason this is such a tough subject is that even some of the worst rip-off events can be an exhilarating shot in the arm or kick in the butt for some people to improve themselves. I’m all for that. What I’m totally against is the manipulation of people solely for financial gain and the devastating letdowns that occur “after” these seminars.

Good, but incomplete

Many seminars provide fairly good, but incomplete information on the front end. This is understandable because it’s pretty naïve to think you can learn what the speaker knows in 90 minutes, all day or even in three or four days. The problem comes in with the high priced coaching packages invariably sold at these events that promise the moon and the “secrets behind the secrets” but only deliver pitch after pitch for more training that leads you down a financial rabbit hole.

Fake excitement and tricks

Once out of the artificially created excitement (and frequently mass hysteria) of the seminar atmosphere, the harsh reality sets in. . . . Most programs you buy don’t even come close to living up to the hype used to sell them to you. Once you see the kind of tricks pulled at these seminars, you’ll be able to make better decisions on whether to attend a particular seminar and once there, whether you should “invest” in further coaching. hahaha (It’s an unwritten law in the seminar business that us speakers use the word “Invest” instead of “buy”. This is so we can manipulate you better.)

Here are some insider tips to watch for when attending a seminar (they are in no particular order and you should probably print this out and take it with you when you attend your next seminar):

I’ll list them here for quick reference and then give more details below.

More at: Top 20 Seminar Scams and Tricks

DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not medical science or medical advice. This information is not backed up by scientific evidence. This is just for your information. This information and these products have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, disorder, pain, injury, deformity, or physical or mental condition. Results are not typical. Individual results may vary. Because every person's situation is different , the author of this article will not be held responsible for any negative results which come from reading or acting upon the information in this article. Use at your own risk. We make no medical claims for any products, nor do we sell them or offer them for the treatment for any ailment.

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The owner of this website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com.